The legal battle for the future of cyber security : What implication for the Mena Region?  


Date: 20 July, 2016
Time: 15:00 CET – 16:00 CET
Platform: Google Hangouts                                          
 
Speakers :
  • Ms. Sana Ali, Independent ICT policy analyst and advocacy professional, BA, MSc. Internet Governance and Global Affairs, Pakistan
  • Ms. Doaa Shendy, Internet Policy Analyst, Lawyer Stanley group, Egypt 
  • Ms. Khouloud Dawahi, Internet Policy and legal Analyst, (MA) Common law, Tunisia
  • Mr. Hamza Salem, Computer Engineer, developer & Audio blogger, Jordan
  • Mr. Nidham Gandoura, Applied Sciences and telecommunication Engineer, Intercultural Comm Researcher INSAT, Tunisia  

Abstract :

The December 2015 terrorist attack in San Bernardino, California., continues to be felt in the Mena region for bringing the ongoing struggle between digital privacy and security to an inflection point. Although the FBI dropped its demand that Apple unlocks the iPhone used by one of the attackers after the Bureau managed to get into the phone on its own, the faceoff between law enforcement and one of the world’s largest tech companies remains largely unresolved. Are the ongoing court cases and law enforcement investigations involving locked iPhones and encrypted messaging platforms a proxy for a larger conflict between corporate governance, governments, and the judiciary ? 

IGmena googles hangout will investigate to what extent should governments have power in a cyber security world that has never become more significant with the case between Apple v.s. FBI when it comes to accessing citizens’ private information. Do Governments have the right to access to iPhone encrypted data without the help of MNCs such as Apple? This raises the question of inference that tells more about setting a precedent for Apple to weaken iPhone’s encryption in the name of national security and facilitate government access to citizens private data. What is the implication of this bipolar conflictual interest on online security, consumer data protection and consumption in the Arab world ? 

During the hangout speakers and debaters from the MENA region will think together about the security, encryption-decryption and access policies for online security. Is there a need for a separation of custodial responsibilities for those handling personal data? Are private data a property rights and what legal frameworks is established to custodial (property) rights in the Mena Region ? 
 
There is an apparent divide between the relative importance accorded to online security practices by « aware end users » in their perceptions, preferences, and practices and the growing level of risk related to online activities in the MENA region. This suggests that the most promising areas for improving online security are in the design choices made by platform providers in expanding cooperative efforts between activists, online security experts, Internet Service Providers (ISP) and platform providers to improve better security options and defaults. What is the recommendation that should be expanded to online security training effort for the increase of monitoring threats to online safety and security practices in the MENA region ? 


Questions :
  • What do you think of the breaking Down Apple's iPhone Fight With the U.S. Government to help investigators gain access to encryoted iPhone data ? 
  • What is the implication of this bipolar conflictual interest on online security and consumer data protection in your country? 
  • Are court cases and law enforcement investigations on locked iPhones as well as encrypted messaging platforms a proxy for a larger conflict between corporate governance, governments, and the law ? 
  • Are private data a property rights ? What legal frameworks is established to custodial property rights in your country? 
  • Do Governments have the right to access to iPhone or another encrypted personal data without the help of Apple or the consent of citizens? 
  • To what extent should governments have power in cybersecurity when it comes to accessing citizens’ private information ?
  • What is your policy recommendation on expanding online security training efforts and increase monitoring threats to online safety ?